History of the Ancient Near East (i+p) (2015/2016)

Teaching is organised as follows:
Unit Credits Academic sector Period Academic staff
I MODULO PARTE (I) 6 L-OR/01-HISTORY OF ANCIENT NEAR EAST Semestrino IB Simonetta Ponchia
II MODULO PARTE (P) 6 L-OR/01-HISTORY OF ANCIENT NEAR EAST Semestrino IIA Simonetta Ponchia

Learning outcomes

Module: I MODULO PARTE (I)
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Knowledge of the cultures, geographical environments, and main periodizations and historical events of the ancient Near East, knowledge of the main historical sources concerning the periods treated and of the methods for their analysis; knowledge of some main and recent approaches to the study of the ancient Near East and of basic bibliographical tools.


Module: II MODULO PARTE (P)
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The second part of the course (p) is aimed at an in-depth study of specific sectors of the history of the ancient Near East and relating sources, at providing the knowledge of specific bibliographical and analytical tools framed in an integrated approach combining historical, philological and archaeological data and methods.

Syllabus

Module: I MODULO PARTE (I)
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The course (i+p) is aimed at providing a comprehensive view of the history of the ancient Near East from prehistory to the first millennium BC. The first part (introductory course) is gerneral in character and considers the major historical periodizations of Syro-Mesopotamian history from the beginning of urban civilization to the Late Babylonian period.
Reference books: M. Liverani, Antico Oriente. Storia, società economia, Roma-Bari (Laterza), 2011; S. de Martino (a cura di), Storia dell’Europa e del Mediterraneo. Il mondo antico. Vol. II: Le civiltà dell’Oriente mediterraneo, Salerno editrice, Roma 2006. Additional bibliography and lectures will be proposed during the lessons.
Students who can not attend the lessons are kindly requested to contact the teacher for specific indications concerning the exam.


Module: II MODULO PARTE (P)
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The second part of the course (p) examines a fundamental institution of ancient societies: slavery and dependence. Various forms of dependence and limited freedom are attested, such as chattel slavery, temporary servitude, dependence from institutions, family and patronage ties, as result of socio-economic, political and war dynamics. In order to interpret the economic and juridical facts and rules that define the free vs. dependent condition and to investigate situations and facts that determined and altered such conditions various documents ought to be considered: royal inscriptions, administrative, legal, and epistolary texts, coming from some selected archives of the Syro-Mesopotamian area.
Bibliographical references: A. Seri, The House of Prisoners, Boston-Berlin 2013; L. Culbertson (ed.), Slaves and Households in the Ancient Near East, Chicago 2011.
Additional bibliographical references, sources, readings will be proposed during the lessons
Methods: lectures, guided analysis of documents. Attendance is recommended; students who can not attend classes are kindly requested to contact the teacher.

Assessment methods and criteria

Module: I MODULO PARTE (I)
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oral exam


Module: II MODULO PARTE (P)
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oral exam