Roman History I - LM (2015/2016)

Course code
4S003214
Name of lecturers
Elvira Migliario, Anselmo Baroni
Coordinator
Elvira Migliario
Number of ECTS credits allocated
12
Academic sector
L-ANT/03 - ROMAN HISTORY
Language of instruction
Italian
Period
II semestre sede Trento dal Feb 15, 2016 al May 31, 2016.

Lesson timetable

Learning outcomes

The course consists of two different sections (A and B).

The first part of the course (A: 15 lectures=30 hours=6 CFU), an "Introduction to Roman epigraphy", aims firstly to introduce to the subject of inscriptions and provide some guidance towards reading and understanding the texts (mostly Latin); secondly, it aims to explain how inscriptions make fundamental sources for any thorough study about ancient Roman world.

The second part (B: 15 lectures=30 hours=6 CFU9), will consider 'Wars and generals in Rome: representations and memory from the Republic to the Empire'. By reading and studying ancient sources, the course aims to demonstrate how an overall appraisal of documents and evidences of different kind can lead to: 1) outline a history of the militarism itself which suffused the Roman ruling class and of the different ways by which its members were either represented or remembered; 2) describe the development which Roman military leadership underwent in the Republican social context; 3) understand the political and cultural meanings of the military leader's transformation after the rise of the Principate.

Syllabus

The course consists of two different sections (A and B).

The first part of the course (A: 15 lectures=30 hours=6 CFU), an "Introduction to Roman epigraphy", aims firstly to introduce to the subject of inscriptions and provide some guidance towards reading and understanding the texts (mostly Latin); secondly, it aims to explain how inscriptions make fundamental sources for any thorough study about ancient Roman world.

The second part (B: 15 lectures=30 hours=6 CFU9), will consider 'Wars and generals in Rome: representations and memory from the Republic to the Empire'. By reading and studying ancient sources, the course aims to demonstrate how an overall appraisal of documents and evidences of different kind can lead to: 1) outline a history of the militarism itself which suffused the Roman ruling class and of the different ways by which its members were either represented or remembered; 2) describe the development which Roman military leadership underwent in the Republican social context; 3) understand the political and cultural meanings of the military leader's transformation after the rise of the Principate.


Prerequisites

Only for students who have already attended Storia romana I/ Roman history I (or a half = 6CFU at least; or Storia romana II/Roman history II LT); basic Latin.


Contents

A - The course will focus upon: the inscribing craft; how to understand and date Roman inscriptions; the survival of epigraphic texts and the history of epigraphy; the historical value of Roman inscriptions. Inscriptions will be read and translated, chosen among texts dating both to the republican and imperial ages (1st cent. B.C.-3rd cent. A. D.) and concerning: Roman republican and imperial society; politics, government, and administration of both the Republic and the Empire.

B - The lessons will be based upon a careful study of various ancient documents: literary sources (readings from Polybius, Cicero, Caesar, Tacitus, Plutarch), Latin inscriptions, archaeological evidences. Some main processes will be considered from the middle-republican age to the early imperial age, and some crucial issues will be especially focused on: role and meaning of the Roman military leadership; the militarism which suffused Roman society as a whole and especially its ruling class; ways and means of (self-) representing and remembering generals and soldiers; the function of the memory of wars in the building of cultural identity; celebratory memories and political functionality of the deeds by military leaders.


Teaching Methods

Lectures and tutorials, seminars



More Information

For the inscriptions to be read by lecturers (of both part A and B), a few tutorials about epigraphical technique and edition will be provided. Attendance to lectures and tutorials as well is highly recommended.



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Assessment methods and criteria

Verification of learning

A: The oral exam will be based on: 1) analyzing two inscriptions from the documents illustrated by the lecturer; 2) commenting on the inscription studied by personal choice; 3) explaining a carefully studied subject from the indicated chapters of the textbook (see below: Testi di riferimento).
B: Oral exam based on the analysis of some of the ancient sources and evidences (as explained by the lecturer); readings from the suggested bibliography.

STUDENT MODULE EVALUATION - 2015/2016