English SC (i) (2018/2019)

Course code
4S02217
Credits
12
Coordinator
Paola Maria Caleffi
Teaching is organised as follows:
Unit Credits Academic sector Period Academic staff
I MODULO PARTE (I) 6 L-LIN/12-LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH Sem. 1A Paola Maria Caleffi
II MODULO PARTE (P) 6 L-LIN/12-LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH Sem. 1B Paola Maria Caleffi

Learning outcomes

The two-module course is aimed at increasing students’ metalinguistic awareness, which will allow them not only to analyse some of the distinctive features of the English language through the study of its origin and evolution, but also and foremost to acquire knowledge of, recognise and exploit the potential of language as a major means of communication. By the end of the course, students will have improved their ability to analyse language and the way in which it is and can be used in specific communicative contexts.

Syllabus

The first Module will deal with the following topics:
1. History of the English language
- Origin
- Old English
- Middle English
- Modern English
- Present-Day English: English as the language of global communication (ENL, ESL, EFL, ELF).
2. Phonetics/Phonology
- The relationship between spelling and pronunciation in English;
- The International Phonetic Alphabet
- The phonological system of General British: vowel sounds; consonant sounds; the notion of “minimal pair”;
- The pronunciation of the morphemes –s e –ed;
- Word accent;
- Phonological transcription;
- Main difference between General British and General American;
- Main accents in the British and in the American varieties;
-The Lingua Franca Core.
3. Morphology
- The morpheme; bound and free morphemes;
- Monomorphemic words and complex words;
- Function and content words;
- Word classes
- Inflectional morphology and word formation processes:
- derivation with affixation
- conversion
- compounding
- blending
- truncation
- abbreviation (acronyms and initialisms)

Texts:
Facchinetti, Roberta (2016). English Phonetics and Morphology. A reader for first year university students. 3rd edition. Verona: Quiedit.
Svartvik, Jan and Leech, Geoffrey (2006). English. One tongue, many voices. Basingstoke/New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapters: 1-5, 7 (pp.124-132), 8, 10-12.
Galloway, Nicola and Heath Rose (2015). Introducing Global Englishes. New York: Routledge. Chapters: 1, 3, 7, 10.

The second Module will deal with the following topics:
1. The notion of “discourse”:
- formalist approach
- functionalist approach
2. The notion of “genre”;
3. Multimodal discourse;
4. Peruasive discourse;
5. Critical discourse analysis as a methodological approach to analyse communication strategies in persuasive discourse;
6. The use of rhetoric and representational strategies in persuasive discourse;
7. Distinctive features of political discourse, with a focus on political speeches;
8. Distinctive features of advertising discourse, with a focus on advertisements;
9. Distinctive features of journalistic discourse, with a focus on news reports and editorials.

Texts:
Machin, David and Mayr, Andrea (2012). How to do critical discourse analysis. LA/London/New Delhi/Singapore/Washington DC: SAGE. Introduction and Chapters 2, 4, 6, 7, 8.
Goddard, Angela (2002). The Language of Advertising. London: Routledge. Units 1, 2, 3, 5, 7.
Charteris-Black, Jonathan (2014). Analysing Political Speeches. Rhetoric, Discourse and Metaphor. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapters: 1 (pp. 3-15), 2 (pp. 39-53), 4, 5.
Richardson, John E. (2007). Analysing Newspapers. An Approach from Critical Discourse Analysis. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapters: 1 (pp. 1-2 e pp. 6-14), 2 (pp. 21-27 e pp. 37-39), 3, 6 (pp. 149-165).

Further bibliographical references for both modules will be provided during the course. Students must also use the teacher’s slides as learning material. The slides will be uploaded on Moodle at the end of every week.

For both Modules, the programmes are the same for attendees and non-attendees.

Assessment methods and criteria

PREREQUISITE: Students must have obtained a B2-level certificate of proficiency in English to be allowed to sit the exam.

The exam will be in English, it will be written, and will refer to BOTH modules. The exam paper will include open-ended and multiple choice questions, as well as practical exercises. It will be divided into two parts, one for the first module, and the other for the second. Before the end of the course, a mock exam will be uploaded on Moodle. The mock exam will also be carried out and corrected during the last class. The exam is designed to assess both the knowledge and understanding of the theoretical contents of both modules, and the ability to apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to concrete situations of language in use.

Reference books
Author Title Publisher Year ISBN Note
Richardson, J.E. Analysing Newspapers. An Approach from Critical Discourse Analysis Palgrave Macmillan 2007
Charteris-Black, J. Analysing Political Speeches. Rhetoric, Discourse and Metaphor Palgrave Macmillan 2014
Svartvik, J. and Leech, G. English. One tongue, many voices Palgrave Macmillan 2006
Facchinetti, R. English Phonetics and Morphology. A reader for first year university students (Edizione 3) QuiEdit 2016
Machin, D. and Mayr, A. How to do Critical Discourse Analysis SAGE 2012
Galloway, N. and Rose, H. Introducing Global English Routledge 2015 978-0-415-83531-2
Goddard, A. The language of advertising Routledge 2002