Germanic philology lm (2017/2018)

Course code
4S004058
Name of lecturer
Maria Adele Cipolla
Coordinator
Maria Adele Cipolla
Number of ECTS credits allocated
6
Academic sector
L-FIL-LET/15 - GERMANIC PHILOLOGY
Language of instruction
English
Location
VERONA
Period
First half of Semester 1 , Second half of Semester 1

Lesson timetable

Go to lesson schedule

Learning outcomes

A. Introduction to the characteristic interdisciplinary aspects of Germanic Philology (textual criticism, historical linguistics, the growth of literacy ).
B. Northern languages in the Medieval manuscript traditions:
1. The Germanic background: Ancient Nordic (= Urnordisch or Proto-Nordico) and its structures (overview of relevant support material available: grammars, lexica, history of languages).
2. Dǫnsk tunga: Common, early Nordic. General observations on the language structure.
3. Old Norwegian
4. Old Icelandic
5. Old Danish
6. Old Swedish.

Syllabus

Northern languages in the Medieval manuscript traditions
In sintesi, il programma è il seguente:

Parte A (= 5 settimane, = 20 ore) - Le "Lingue nordiche nella tradizione medievale"
Parte B (= 4 settimane, = 16 ore) – Le premesse: critica testuale, linguistica storica, nascita delle letterature volgari.

Teaching
Teaching modalities are different for attendees and non-attendees. Only for attendees: ongoing self-evaluation test (it will be scheduled during the course).
Throughout the entire academic year, the instructor is available weekly during her visiting hours (schedule available on this webpage, but can be subject to variations), generally with no need to arrange an appointment, unless there are specific announcements.

At the beginning of the course attendees will receive a complete schedule of the teaching activities (including class dates and place). Possible postponements of the classes will be announced via the e-learning platform.
Non-attendees are kindly requested to contact the instructor. Possible updates will be made available in good time also by means of dedicated posts on the e-learning platform. Therefore everybody is supposed to subscribe to it.
Content of textbooks, as well as of classes and exercise held during the course comply with the programme. Further materials is available on the e-learning.

The course will begin with an Introduction to the characteristic interdisciplinary aspects of Germanic Philology (textual criticism, historical linguistics, the growth of literacy ).

As an introduction to the history of textual critical methods, we suggest the reading of the following bibliographical entry:

David Greetham, "A history of textual scholarship", in The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship, ed. by N. Fraistat and J. Flanders, Cambridge: University Press, 2013

As an introduction to historical linguistics , we suggest the reading of the following bibliographical entries:

Momma Haruko and Michael Matto (eds.), A Companion to the History of the English Language, London, Blackwell-Wiley 2008
and
Robinson, Orrin W., Old English and its closest relatives: a survey of the earliest Germanic languages. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1992.

The main section of the course will deal with "Northern languages in the Medieval manuscript traditions": it will include the following topics
1. The Germanic background: Ancient Nordic (= Urnordisch or Proto-Nordico) and its structures (overview of relevant support material available: grammars, lexica, history of languages).
2. Dǫnsk tunga: Common, early Nordic. General observations on the language structure.
3. Old Norwegian
4. Old Icelandic
5. Old Danish
6. Old Swedish.

As reading for the main part of the course we suggest the reading of the following bibliographical entry:

Barnes, Michael, Anthony Faulkes, A new introduction to Old Norse, 3 volumes. 1. Grammar. 2. Reader. 3. Glossary and Index of Names, London: Viking Society for Northern Research, 2008.

Further bibliographical suggestions will be indicated during the course.

During the course, prof. O.E. Haugen (University of Bergen) will hold 6 lectures on the above-mentioned topics, according to the following schedule (room S1, Polo Zanotto):

OCTOBER
Mon. 2 10.10-11.50 *open lecture*
Wedn. 4 11.50-13.30
Mon. 9 10.10-11.50 *open lecture*
Wedn. 11 11.50-13.30
Thursd. 12 17.20-19.00
Mon. 16 10.10-11.50 *open lecture*

***
Students are warmly invited to participate in the workshop "Digital tools for the analysis of literary texts" (Verona, 23-26 October 2017). Credits: 3cfu
Program and registration at: http://filologiadigitale-verona.it/uncategorized/ws_ottobre_17/

Reference books
Author Title Publisher Year ISBN Note
David Greetham "A history of textual scholarship", in The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship, ed. by N. Fraistat and J. Flanders Cambridge University Press 2013 Introduction: textual scholarship in the age of media consciousness Neil Fraistat and Julia Flanders 1 A history of textual scholarship David Greetham 2 Anglo-American editorial theory Kathryn Sutherland 3 Continental editorial theory Geert Lernout 4 Late twentieth-century Shakespeares Hans Walter Gabler 5 Apparatus, text, interface: how to read a printed critical edition Paul Eggert 6 The politics of textual scholarship Michelle R. Warren 7 Fearful asymmetry Random Cloud 8 What is a book? Roger Chartier and Peter Stallybrass 9 Orality John D. Niles 10 Manuscript textuality Michael Sargent 11 Picture criticism: textual studies and the image Kari Kraus 12 Track changes: textual scholarship and the challenge of the born digital Matthew G. Kirschenbaum and Doug Reside Coda: why digital textual scholarship matters Jerome J. McGann
Barnes Michael A new introduction to Old Norse, 3 volumes. 1. Grammar. 2. Reader. 3. Glossary and Index of Names Viking Society for Northern Research 2008 9780903521741
Robinson, Orrin W. Old English and its closest relatives: a survey of the earliest Germanic languages. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press 1992

Assessment methods and criteria

Oral exams during the official exam sessions scheduled and published by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures (available online).

Assessment will include:
ATTENDEES--> ongoing evaluation test referring to the 1st part of the programme and oral exams on the orher part of the programme
NON-ATTEDEES--> oral exam on the whole programme

Objective of the assessment
In the middle of the course (after the 5th week), interested students can take an ongoing written exam (which will be preceeded by a collective self-evaluation mock-test, corrected and discussed in the class), aimed at evaluating students' knowledge on the introductory parts of the programme (it will deal with the first 5 weeks of classess) and the corresponding bibliography.

The intermediate ongoing written exam will be structured according to groups of questions related to the main themes of the course discussed during the classes, with the support of learning materials which will be prepared ad hoc. The evaluation is expressed in 30/30. The written exam will be subject to an evaluation which the student will integrate with the oral exam.
To foster the correct understanding of the contents and of the modalities of the pre-assessment written test during the classes the test of last year will be available and subject to discussion (this is already available on the e-learning).

Non-attendees as well as attendees who will not take the ongoing written exam, will take an oral exam on the entire programme. The final evaluation is expressed in 30/30.
The oral exam will deal with both the development of issues related to the written test (if taken) and with the 2nd part of the programme.
The oral exam will assess:
- depth and extent of acquired knowledge
- accuracy of acquired vocabulary
- ability to establish connections among aspects concerning the different parts of the programme

ERASMUS students are kindly requested to contact me at the beginning of the course to arrange both learning and assessment modalities.

STUDENT MODULE EVALUATION - 2017/2018