Germanic philology lm (2018/2019)

Course code
4S004058
Name of lecturer
Maria Adele Cipolla
Coordinator
Maria Adele Cipolla
Number of ECTS credits allocated
6
Academic sector
L-FIL-LET/15 - GERMANIC PHILOLOGY
Language of instruction
English
Location
VERONA
Period
Sem. 1A dal Sep 24, 2018 al Nov 10, 2018.

Lesson timetable

Go to lesson schedule

Learning outcomes

The course covers methods and contents of historical linguistics, paleography and codicology, textual criticism and digital philology, cultural history (all referred to the Germanic languages and their traditions) and aims at transmitting advanced knowledges of the principal aspects of Germanic Philology.

Expected results:
- Advanced knowledge on methodologies and cultural contents which are necessary to analyse and interpret Germanic linguistic and literary traditions.
- Delve into the main multidisciplinary aspects of Germanic Philology and reinforce the mastery of a correct and accurate specialistic terminology.
- Delve into the main specialistic fields of Germanic Philology (historical linguistics, textual criticism and digital philology, paleography and codicology and cultural history), mainly focussing on historical linguistics, in compliance with the learning outcomes of the Master Degree in Linguistics.

Syllabus

Course Title – Translations. The growth of Old Germanic vernacular traditions and the translational activity, between Late Antiquity and the High Middle Ages: 1. Biblical Gothic and 2. Old Norwegian

1. Biblical Gothic: the ending of Mark Gospel in the Speyer Fragment (classes will take place on 24, 26, 27 September, 15, 17, 18, 22, 24, 25, 30, 31 October, and November, 5)

2. Prof. Odd Einar Haugen, University of Bergen - Studying an Old Norwegian manuscript: 'Strengleikar' in Uppsala DG 4-7 fol. (ca. 1270) (classes will take place on 1, 3, 4, 8, 10 , 11 October).

Part 1 of the course (prof. A. Cipolla) will be divided into two main sections, according to the schedule here below:

- Part A (12 hours) will consist in a reassessment of the interdisciplinary aspects of Germanic Philology (historical linguistics, textual criticism and digital scholarly editing, the growth of literacy in the Germanic speaking countries), particularly focusing on the Gothic language and on a contrastive analysis of its main features (syntax and lexis);

Part B (12 hours) will consist in a reassessment of

The philological issues posited by the manuscript corpus of the so-called Biblical Gothic, on the instance of the ‘long’ ending of the Gospel of Mark (16, 13-20), from the Speyer Fragment.

SUGGESTED READINGS

PART 1. A (prof. A. Cipolla)

As a survey of the history of textual criticism:

David Greetham, ‘A history of textual scholarship’, in The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship, ed. by N. Fraistat and J. Flanders, Cambridge: University Press, 2013;


As a survey of the main features of the Germanic languages, in diachronic and comparative perspective:

Robinson, Orrin W., Old English and its closest relatives: a survey of the earliest Germanic languages. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1992.

Klein, Jared S., Brian D. Joseph, Matthias Fritz, and Mark Wenthe (eds) , Handbook of comparative and historical Indo-European linguistics, Volume 2, Berlin- Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2017, chapters IX, 53 (The Documentation of Germanic), 54 (The Phonology of Germanic), 55 (The Morphology of Germanic), 56 (The Syntax of Germanic), 57 (The Lexicon of Germanic), 58 (The Dialectology of Germanic), 59 (The Evolution of Germanic)

The portal Wulfila Project (University of Antwerpen - http://www.wulfila.be/) will provide materials and tools to historical-linguistic and text-critical approach to Biblical Gothic (XML transcriptions of the standard edition of Ulphilas’s Bible, grammars, dictionaries, reference works).

Through the portal you can access the standard edition of Ulphilas’s Bible:

Wilhelm Streitberg (Hrsg.), Die gotische Bibel, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1919.

As a Gothic Grammar, particularly for English-speaking students:

Joseph Wright, Grammar of the Gothic Language, Oxford: Clarendon Press,1910
(accessible at: https://archive.org/stream/grammargothicla00wriggoog#page/n4, or at: http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html)

PART 1. B (prof. A. Cipolla)
To delve into single relevant philological issues of Biblical Gothic:

Falluomini, Carla. 2015,The gothic version of the Gospels and Pauline Epistles: cultural background, transmission and character, Berlin-Boston: de Gruyter, 2015.
Introduction
3 Wulfila and his context
4 The Gothic witnesses to the Gospels and Pauline Epistles
4 Linguistic and stylistic features

Appendix II.2 The Long Ending of Mark

The edition of the Speyer Fragment in:

Wilhelm Streitberg-Piergiuseppe Scardigli, Der gotische Text und seine griechische Vorlage: mit Einleitung, Lesarten und Quellennachweisen sowie den kleineren Denkmalern als Anhang / mit einem Nachtrag von Piergiuseppe Scardigli. - 7. Aufl. Band 2: Gotisch-griechisch-deutsches Worterbuch / um zwei neue Worter erganzt von Piergiuseppe Scardigli. - 6. Aufl., Hedelberg: Winter, 2000

PART 2. (prof. O. E. Haugen)

Students wishing to focus more closely on topics presented in class by Prof. Odd Einar Haugen will be provided with an additional bibliography during his course (papers and book chapters of Prof. Haugen's bibliography are accessible on the moodle platform)

Teaching
Teaching modalities are different for attendees and non-attendees. Only for attendees: ongoing self-evaluation test (it will be scheduled during the course).
Throughout the entire academic year, the instructor is available weekly during her visiting hours (schedule available on this webpage, but can be subject to variations), generally with no need to arrange an appointment, unless there are specific announcements.

At the beginning of the course attendees will receive a complete schedule of the teaching activities (including class dates and place). Possible postponements of the classes will be announced via the e-learning platform.
Non-attendees are kindly requested to contact the instructor. Possible updates will be made available in good time also by means of dedicated posts on the e-learning platform. Therefore, everybody is supposed to subscribe to it.
Content of textbooks, as well as of classes and exercise held during the course comply with the syllabus. Further materials are available on the e-learning platform.


Reference books
Author Title Publisher Year ISBN Note
David Greetham A history of textual scholarship, in The Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship, ed. by Neil Fraistat, Julia Flanders, pp. 16-41 Cambridge University Press 2013
Wilhelm Streitberg (Hrsg) Die gotische Bibel Heidelberg: Winter 1908 https://archive.org/stream/diegotischebibe02stregoog#page/n14/mode/1up
Joseph Wright Grammar of the Gothic Language Oxford: Clarendon Press 1910
Klein, Jared / Joseph, Brian / Fritz, Matthias eds Handbook of comparative and historical Indo-European linguistics Berlin-Boston: de Gruyter 2017 ISBN 978-3-11-052387-4 Chapters IX, 53 (The Documentation of Germanic), 54 (The Phonology of Germanic), 55 (The Morphology of Germanic), 56 (The Syntax of Germanic), 57 (The Lexicon of Germanic), 58 (The Dialectology of Germanic), 59 (The Evolution of Germanic) Volume 2, pp. 53-59 As an introduction to Indo-European, volume 1, pp. 1-25 and 85-92
Robinson, Orrin W. Old English and its closest relatives: a survey of the earliest Germanic languages. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press 1992 http://www.politicalavenue.com/languageschool/ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-BOOKS/07%20Old%20English%20and%20Its%20Closest%20Relatives.pdf
Falluomini, Carla The gothic version of the Gospels and Pauline Epistles: cultural background, transmission and character Berlin-Boston: de Gruyter 2015 Introduction 1 Wulfila and his context 2 The Gothic witnesses to the Gospels and Pauline Epistles 4 Linguistic and stylistic features 5. 6. Transmission in two witnesses Appendix II.2 The Long Ending of Mark

Assessment methods and criteria

Oral exams during the official exam sessions scheduled and published by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.
Assessment will include:
ATTENDEES--> ongoing preliminary test (intermediate written exam on the first part of the course) + oral exam on the other part of the programme.
NON-ATTENDEES--> oral exam on the whole programme.

Objective of assessment
ATTENDEES
In the middle of the course (after the 5th week), attendee students can take a written test (which will be corrected and discussed within the class with self-evaluation), aimed at evaluating students' knowledge on the introductory parts of the programme (it will deal with the first 5 weeks of classes) and the corresponding bibliography.
The intermediate written exam will be structured according to groups of questions related to the main themes of the first part of course; the preparation of the exam will be supported by learning materials which will be prepared ad hoc. The evaluation is expressed in 30/30. The written exam will be subject to an evaluation which the student will integrate with the oral exam.
For attendees the oral exam will deal with the development of issues related to the written test and will assess:
- depth and extent of acquired knowledge
- accuracy of acquired vocabulary
- ability to link aspects concerning both parts of the programme
To foster the correct understanding of the contents and of the modalities of the ongoing written test during the classes the test of last years will be discussed
The final evaluation is expressed in 30/30.
NON-ATTENDEES
The oral exam will be on the entire programme. The final evaluation is expressed in 30/30.

Erasmus students are kindly requested to contact the instructor at the beginning of the course to arrange both learning and assessment modalities.

STUDENT MODULE EVALUATION - 2017/2018