Greek History I - LM (2018/2019)

Course code
4S003213
Credits
12
Coordinator
Elena Franchi
Teaching is organised as follows:
Unit Credits Academic sector Period Academic staff
MODULO II 6 L-ANT/02-GREEK HISTORY Sem. II Trento Elena Franchi
MODULO I 6 L-ANT/02-GREEK HISTORY Sem. II Trento Elena Franchi

Learning outcomes

Educational aims of the course "Federalism at war" are:

-to develop students' knowledge and understanding of ancient Greek ‘federal’ states
-to develop students' knowledge and understanding of the impact of war, both internal and external, on ancient Greek federalism
-to provide the intellectual tools for critically discussing the relevant historical events

Learning outcomes.

a. Knowledge and understanding. Students are expected

-to get familiar with ancient Greek ‘federal’ states.
-to understand the main problems related to the development and the mechanisms of decision-making in ancient Greek ‘federal’ states
-to understand the different ways war shaped formation, institutional development and sometimes dissolution of ancient Greek federal states

b. Skills. Students are expected:

-to read and to observe critically primary and secondary source material relevant to Greek ‘federal’ states and connected historical problems and valuate different sources of information
-to recognize historical problems and to formulate their own questions about major historical issues connected with ancient ‘federalism’
-to gradually develop the ability to approach historical problems with academic rigour

Syllabus

-historical geography of Ancient Greece
-scholarship on Greek ‘federal states’: beyond the “tribal state”
-terminological problems: ethne, leagues, koinà, confederations, federations
-the ethnic background of the Greek ‘federal' states;
-the impact of war on ethnogenesis and koinogenesis
-the double citizenship
-subdivisions providing a formula for league membership
-institutions and magistracies; primary assemblies vs. representative bodies
-the impact of war on federalism: case-studies:
• Boiotians
• Phokians
• Thessalians
• Akarnanians
• Aitolians
• Arkadians
• Eleians

Teaching and learning methods and activities:

The course is taught through a combination of lectures (frontal teaching), classroom discussions, cooperative learning (primary sources) and flipped classroom. Formative tests will be made available.

Entrance requirements:

Students are expected to be already familiar with the outlines of the history of the ancient Greek world.
Knowledge of ancient Greek is not required.
Students are expected to be able to closely read texts and to critically manage complex information.

Assessment methods and criteria

Attending students:
1)Cooperative learning session, last stage: 40%. Students will discuss the results of their analysis.
2)The final oral exam (60%) will assess the students' ability to critically discuss one or more topics based on the reading list provided.

Non-attending students:
1)One paper (30%) discussing a topic to be agreed upon with the lecturer.
2)The final oral exam (70%) will assess the students' ability to critically discuss one or more topics based on the reading list provided.

Non-attending students are invited to contact the lecturer (elena.franchi@unitn.it).

Reference books
Author Title Publisher Year ISBN Note
H.Beck-P. Funke Federalism in Greek Antiquity (Edizione 1) Cambridge University Press 2015 978-0-521-19226-2 Del volume vanno preparati: 1) il saggio introduttivo: H.Beck-P. Funke, "An introduction to federalism in Greek antiquity", in H.Beck-P. Funke, Federalism in Greek Antiquity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1-29. 2) il saggio di Sh. Ager: Sh. Ager, “Peaceful conflict resolution in the world of the federal states”, in H.Beck-P. Funke, Federalism in Greek Antiquity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 471-486.
M. Bettalli - A.L. D’Agata - A. Magnetto Storia greca Carocci 2013